FREE Quilt Pattern – A Framed Life

“A Framed Life” Photo Quilt

Finished Quilt Size – Approx. 93” X 115” (Queen)

This is a great gift for a graduate – the quilt is designed to hold 48 pictures, imagine it with pictures of your grad from birth to cap and gown! For the story of how this quilt came to be, and pictures from the quilt made by my daughter using this pattern, see the post A Framed Life.

Materials
24 sheets June Tailor Colorfast Computer Printer Fabric™
1 2/3 yards brown – 1st picture border
3 yards lt. blue – 2nd picture border
3 yards dk. blue – 2nd picture border
1/2 yard 1st border fabric
1 1/3 yard 2nd border fabric
2 1/3 yard 3rd border fabric
3/4 yard Quilt Binding
Batting
Backing Fabric

Suggested Tools
Rotary Cutter
Cutting Mat
12 1/2″ square ruler

  1. Choose 48 images for the quilt – you can repeat pictures if you want, but it’s more fun if you have 48 different images!
  2. Size pictures on computer to 5” square, you should be able to get two pictures on each sheet of printer fabric. Make sure to leave 1/2” between the two pictures so you will be able to have a 1/4” seam allowance around each picture.
  3. Process the pictures onto the fabric according to instructions on the packaging. Cut fabric pictures to 5 1/2” square, leaving the 1/4” (seam allowance) around each side of each picture.
  4. Create the first frame around your each of your pictures following these steps:
    • Cut fabric WOF (width of fabric) 4 strips 5 1/2”
    • Sub-cut these 4 strips into 96 strips 5 1/2” X 1 3/4”
    • Sew to both sides of 48 pictures
    • Each of your picture blocks will now be 8” wide, by 5 1/2” long
    • Cut WOF (width of fabric) 4 strips 8”
    • Sub-cut these 4 strips into 96 strips 8” X 1 3/4”
    • Sew to both top and bottom of pictures
    • You will now have a block that is 8” square
  5. Create the second frame around each of your pictures following these steps
    • Cut WOF from each of the two different blue frame fabrics
      • 4 Strips 8” WOF – Sub cut to 48 8” x 3 3/4”
      • 4 Strips 15” WOF – Sub cut to 48 15” x 3 3/4”
    • NOTE: when you are finished, you will have 96 sub-cuts that are 8” long, and 96 that are 15” long (48 from each of the two blue fabrics)
    • Sew 8” strips to sides of bordered picture
    • NOTE: Sew side borders on first 1/2 of blocks with one fabric and the other 1/2 with second fabric.
    • Sew 15” strips to top and bottom of the picture blocks. If you used fabric A for the side of the frame on a picture, use fabric B for the top of the frame.
    • You will now have 48 blocks that have light blue fabric at the top and bottom, and 48 blocks that have dark blue fabric at the top and bottom.

  6. Using the 12½” square ruler, you will be cutting an 11½” square on the angle as shown with the bold line n the image below. (I find it helpful to put blue masking tape on the ruler for a visual of the 11½”.)
  7. Make sure your block is square on your cutting mat before you lay the square ruler over it. The square should not cut into the brown borders at all, and the corners of the ruler will touch each of the edges of your blue fabrics.
  8. OPTIONAL – When cutting your blocks at an angle, you may want to alternate the rotation of the photos on the blocks (this provides another bit of visual interest and breaks up the pattern slightly). The easy way to do this is to cut two blocks at a time.
    • Lay a block with the dark blue fabric with the photo (right side) face up.
    • Lay a block with the light blue fabric on top of it, with the photo (right side) face down.
    • Cut through both squares at the same time. Your photos will be at different (mirror) angles to one another.
    • If you choose this method, make certain you are consistent. You want all of the blocks with dark blue tops angled one direction, and all of the light blue tops angled the other direction.
  9. Sew the quilt together 6 blocks across by 8 blocks down. (The image of the quilt that follows shows a quilt that was made using the optional step 8.)
  10. Add your quilt borders –
    • 1st border cut 8 strips 2” wide
    • 2nd border cut 9 strips 5” wide
    • 3rd border cut 10 strips 8” wide
    • Binding 10 strips 2 1/2” wide

If you would like a PDF copy of this pattern, click here. But be sure to read the fine print below! Thank you!

Pattern by: Sheila Reinke, 2008
All rights reserved. A copy of this pattern may be made for personal, home use. You may not copy for commercial use without prior written permission. If you are a teacher who wishing to use this pattern for quilting instruction, please contact Sheila Reinke at https://sheilareinke.wordpress.com/

Sheila Reinke, Heart of Sewing
Sheila

Photo Fabric – not just for pictures!

As I promised in Friday’s Post “Tips on Using Photo Print Fabrics“, today I want to share with you a quilt that my daughter is making as a gift for a friend of hers.

She choose to make this quilt a little differently, rather than using photos, she choose Bible verses that were meaningful to the person she is giving the quilt to.  So yes, as I said in the title, photo fabric is NOT just for pictures – we should probably call it ‘printer’ fabric, because that’s more appropriate.

This is just one of the blocks in the quilt. The only thing in this project that differed from the instructions I gave you on Friday’s post (see link above) is that the ‘image’ in this case is wording. So rather than locating a picture on her computer, she created the image using software on the computer. A text image like this could be created using a word processor or a graphic editor, whatever works best for you and you are most comfortable with.

This quilt was made using one of the Turning Twenty patterns, so here you can see a full ‘block’ from the quilt. One of the things that makes turning twenty quilts so much fun visually is that the individual blocks don’t jump right out at you.

On Friday’s post, I included pictures of the label that was being made to go with this quilt. Here is the label, first framed in a brown fabric to make it look like a photo frame, and then added to the quilt back.

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The use of a photo as a quilt label was really a great idea – and I’m glad that she thought of it. I’ll have to try that with at least ONE of my gift projects in the future. Imagine giving a quilt as a gift and knowing that years later someone will have a picture of you that was current from the period when the quilt was made – what a wonderful gift to include!

And here is the completed quilt – you may notice that instead of 20 blocks (as their should be in a Turning Twenty quilt), this quilt was completed with 15 blocks. That is because my daughter didn’t want the quilt to be quite as wide, so she left off a row of blocks. So rather than having 5 rows of 4 blocks each, she has 5 rows of 3 blocks each.

Sorry I couldn’t get a good image of the lettering in each of the boxes, but as you can see from the closeup of the block at the top of this post, the color is a subtle one that was chosen to coordinate with the fabrics used. But each of those 15 light colored blocks does have a separate scripture verse in the block.

Sheila Reinke, Heart of Sewing
Sheila

Tips on Using Photo Print Fabrics

Today, I’d like to expand a bit on one of the products used in yesterday’s DYK post on June Tailor printer fabrics.

I have been making photo fabric quilts, pillows, purses, etc. for about 6 years now, and I have always been impressed with the Colorfast product from June Tailor. I can’t tell you how many times I have worked with this product.

I have told so many people that if you want to encourage a young person to start sewing, just use a printer fabric to include a picture in the project and they will love sewing. It is so easy to put a picture of their dog, favorite friend, first car, etc. Personalize their project and you won’t be able to stop them from making more projects.

Since I started my daughter with the pictures she has made 5 queen size photo quilts with 48 pictures each as well as lots of other smaller quilts. She makes almost all her gifts, and several projects are sewn. Next week you will see a quilt she is making to give to a friend.

I was on the road traveling so I asked her to take some pictures of the process of putting a photo onto the colorfast product. Her response was why not create a label she will add to the back of the quilt she is currently making? Great idea!!

Stayed tuned for next week to see her complete finished project, but here are the images she sent me in making her lable.

  1. Decide on pictures or writing you want.
  2. Use email, file transfer, scanner, (you get the idea) or create the image you want on your computer. (Just because I am calling it photo fabric, don’t forget that anything you can print on your printer at home can be printed onto this fabric.)
  3. Resize the image to the size you want the finished product to be.
  4. Put sheet of fabric photo sheet with paper on the back into your printer. IMPORTANT: Needs to be an inkjet printer – most current home printers are inkjet, but double check if you aren’t sure what you have. Optional – you may want to do a test print of your finished image before printing onto the colorfast sheet.
  5. Print the image.
  6. Let the ink dry.
  7. Peel paper backing off
  8. Rinse fabric with design under water.
  9. Let dry – (I let dry on a terry cloth towel)
  10. Press
  11. It’s now ready to sew into your project!

Give this a try – you’ll love it and the results!

Here are some other projects I’ve seen recently using photo printer fabrics

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Sheila Reinke, Heart of Sewing
Sheila